Recent Storm Damage Posts

My Flight Was Canceled - Now What?

9/22/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage My Flight Was Canceled - Now What? Storm in Fullerton, CA? Don't let this ruin your trip

Whether you have been planning a trip or trying to get home, few things are more frustrating than finding out you have a canceled flight due to stormy weather. What can you do after such a cancellation? Here are three tips that you can use to make the situation less chaotic.

1. Contact the Airline

The first thing that you should do is contact the airline. If its customer service is exceptional, you should be able to get rebooked fairly quickly. It is better to make a call than to wait in long lines, as you can get through faster and be in the air earlier.

2. Consider Lodging

This tip is important to remember after a canceled flight if you are currently traveling: if it does not look like you will be getting a new flight very quickly, do not take a chance on not having somewhere to stay. Do some online research so you can book the most affordable yet comfortable hotel room. Rest is important after a trying day, and an airline issue should not result in you being stranded without shelter in dangerous conditions. If you are stuck home in Fullerton, CA, and are not sure what to do about storm damage, contact a restoration company for assistance.

3. Research Reimbursement

The airline understands that a canceled trip is stressful for you; as a result, you may be able to get a refund of some sort from the company. Whether you end up getting all of your ticket money back or compensation for your hotel charges, it could pay to call the airline and see what it considers you are entitled to.

Being aware of an airline’s cancellation policy before your journey begins can help you prepare for a possible canceled flight. In any case, the flight-related storm tips above will help you stress less and get back to enjoying your current or future travels once a storm passes.

How To Remedy a Garage Flood

8/20/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage How To Remedy a Garage Flood Sump pumps can be used to get rid of water flooding in your business garage

When you own a commercial property in La Habra, CA, storm season may leave the parts of your building that bridge the gap between the external and internal areas vulnerable. Your structure's garage may take on flooding, and you may need special equipment and professional storm cleanup services to help. Here are three ways that you can remove standing water from your garage area.

1. Sump Pumps

Many basements are equipped with sump pumps to start extracting floodwater as soon as it becomes a problem. Some pumps are portable, allowing the cleanup crew to move them to the place that needs them the most. An industrial sump pump is designed to remove large volumes of water from the flooded area to a container of some sort. It is an effective way to remove water quickly.

2. Trash Pumps

Sump pumps can get clogged, so they're not the best solution when it comes to removing trash. If there is a lot of debris in the flooded area, a trash pump may be necessary. This piece of equipment can remove sludge as well as water.

3. Truck Mounts

If you are removing a large amount of water from your garage, the water has to be moved somewhere. If the flooding occurred as the result of a storm, the water is a Category 3 contaminant and thus must also be disposed of in a way that does not further contaminate the garage or some other area. Truck mounts siphon the water into a storage unit in a truck so that it can be transported easily to the disposal site. The sump pump or trash pump being used does the work on the scene while the truck mount directs the extracted substances into storage.

When storms flood the garage of your commercial building, don't just ignore it and hope the problem will dissipate. Taking action to extract water and debris with the right equipment can get the space clean and functional faster.

For more on La Habra click here

Essential Flood Facts for Drivers

7/23/2018 (Permalink)

It’s easy to underestimate the power of flood waters, and unfortunately, too many drivers make that mistake. According to government statistics, attempted driving is a factor in half of flood drownings. It is crucial to understand what makes driving on a flooded street so dangerous, as well as how to avoid it.

More Dangerous Than It Seems

There are many hazards associated with driving in flood waters, making it best to avoid them at all costs.

• The water is often deeper than it looks, and it can be hard to tell whether there is a current and how quickly it is flowing. The street below may also be at risk of washing away.
• It doesn’t take much water to cause a vehicle to float. If you’re in a small car, as little as a foot of water can pick you up off a flooded street.
• Your vehicle’s engine may stall when exposed to water.
• Damaged electrical lines in the water pose the risk of electrocution
• Vehicles are likely to tip if caught in a current, making escape extremely difficult.

Pre-Flood Prep Is Key

The best way to stay safe during a flood is to prepare beforehand. Assemble supplies and a plan. Keep documents and other important objects in a safe place and in waterproof storage. Consider flood insurance and know how to contact your local flood cleanup crew should you need them. Above all, you should evacuate as soon as possible if La Habra, CA authorities recommend it.

Travel Tips

Even with precautions, it’s still possible to run into flooded roads. Stay safe by knowing the area well. If traveling, try to map out alternate routes ahead of time in case you need to turn around. If worst comes to worst and you have no other choice but to drive through, proceed with extreme caution. Drive very slowly, and if the vehicle starts taking on water, it’s time to get out of the car and head to a safer place.

It is always safer to evacuate early or stay home and follow the plans you’ve made. Remember there is no safe way to drive on a flooded street. Visit http://www.SERVPROoflahabrawestfullerton.com for more information on flood damage.