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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Essential Flood Facts for Drivers

7/23/2018 (Permalink)

It’s easy to underestimate the power of flood waters, and unfortunately, too many drivers make that mistake. According to government statistics, attempted driving is a factor in half of flood drownings. It is crucial to understand what makes driving on a flooded street so dangerous, as well as how to avoid it.

More Dangerous Than It Seems

There are many hazards associated with driving in flood waters, making it best to avoid them at all costs.

• The water is often deeper than it looks, and it can be hard to tell whether there is a current and how quickly it is flowing. The street below may also be at risk of washing away.
• It doesn’t take much water to cause a vehicle to float. If you’re in a small car, as little as a foot of water can pick you up off a flooded street.
• Your vehicle’s engine may stall when exposed to water.
• Damaged electrical lines in the water pose the risk of electrocution
• Vehicles are likely to tip if caught in a current, making escape extremely difficult.

Pre-Flood Prep Is Key

The best way to stay safe during a flood is to prepare beforehand. Assemble supplies and a plan. Keep documents and other important objects in a safe place and in waterproof storage. Consider flood insurance and know how to contact your local flood cleanup crew should you need them. Above all, you should evacuate as soon as possible if La Habra, CA authorities recommend it.

Travel Tips

Even with precautions, it’s still possible to run into flooded roads. Stay safe by knowing the area well. If traveling, try to map out alternate routes ahead of time in case you need to turn around. If worst comes to worst and you have no other choice but to drive through, proceed with extreme caution. Drive very slowly, and if the vehicle starts taking on water, it’s time to get out of the car and head to a safer place.

It is always safer to evacuate early or stay home and follow the plans you’ve made. Remember there is no safe way to drive on a flooded street. Visit http://www.SERVPROoflahabrawestfullerton.com for more information on flood damage. 

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